Guide Grammar to go. How it works and how to use it

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Articles

  1. Using Italics and Underlining
  2. The Forms of “To Be”
  3. 'to'-infinitives

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Or try sample quizzes before you buy. Homonyms often cause confusion. Here are a few tricky ones, mostly all vs. Read More Subscribe Now. Enable JavaScript Uh oh! Hide Notice.

Using Italics and Underlining

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Buy the Book The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation is a concise, entertaining workbook and guide to English grammar, punctuation, and usage. Online Quizzes Subscribe now to receive hundreds of additional English usage quizzes not found anywhere else! In the final example, the subject complement they identifies the subject friends. It tells who the friends are.

They also follow linking verbs. A less contemporary term for an adjective used as a subject complement is predicate adjective. In the first example, the subject complement friendly modifies the subject coworkers. In the second example, the subject complement exciting modifies the subject story. Henry Holt, Consider this sentence:. The verb is named. To find the subject, ask, 'Who or what named?

Now ask, 'Whom or what did she name?

The Forms of “To Be”

Any word following the direct object that renames or describes the direct object is an object complement. She named the baby Bruce, so Bruce is the object complement. Wadsworth, "The object complement characterizes the object in the same way as the subject complement characterizes the subject: it identifies, describes, or locates the object as in We chose Bill as group leader, We consider him a fool, She laid the baby in the crib , expressing either its current state or resulting state as in They found him in the kitchen vs.

Linking negatives

She made him angry. It is not possible to delete the object complement without either radically changing the meaning of the sentence e. She called him an idiot - She called him or making the sentence ungrammatical e. Note that be or some other copula verb can often be inserted between the direct object and the object complement e. I consider him to be a fool, We chose Bill to be group leader, They found him to be in the kitchen. Brinton and Donna M.

'to'-infinitives

John Benjamins, Even in one grammar, that of Quirk et al. In other grammars, this second meaning is extended to other phrases. It therefore appears to have very broad reference, to anything that is needed to complete the meaning of some other linguistic unit. We often need to add something to a verb , noun , or adjective to complete its meaning. If somebody says I want , we expect to hear what he or she wants; the words the need obviously don't make sense alone; after hearing I'm interested , we may need to be told what the speaker is interested in.

Words and expressions which 'complete' the meaning of a verb, noun, or adjective are also called 'complements. But nouns and adjectives normally need prepositions to join them to noun or -ing form complements. Oxford University Press, Share Flipboard Email. Richard Nordquist is a freelance writer and former professor of English and Rhetoric who wrote college-level Grammar and Composition textbooks.